LASIK Surgery

What is LASIK?

LASIK is a procedure that uses lasers to gently reshape the front section of one’s eyes, improving vision and often times eliminating the need for glasses and contact lenses. LASIK stands for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis. The procedure itself takes only a few minutes to perform, and the recovery time is extremely fast. In fact, many patients see clearly immediately following their procedure, and the vast majority of patients ultimately see 20/20 or better after LASIK.

How LASIK Works

LASIK does not “burn” cells away. The laser used in LASIK is called an excimer laser, and it is a “cold laser” that ablates cells away rather than burning tissue. This type of laser is ideal for reshaping the cornea, which is the clear tissue at the front of the eye. When LASIK was approved in 1996, refractive surgeons (doctors who perform LASIK and other vision improving procedures) did not have many of the advances that we have in modern LASIK.

Wavefront-guided LASIK allows us to use light to generate a unique map (and laser treatment) of your eyes. Your treatment is every bit as unique as your fingerprint. When we create your laser treatment, we are reshaping your cornea such that it refracts light ideally into your eye. However, in order to minimize the recovery time, we also create a corneal flap. This involves using either a microkeratome or another laser to make a thin layer of tissue that is actually folded over and away from the treatment area. Once the treatment is complete, the corneal flap is replaced, and surgery is over.

Recovery Time

Recovery from LASIK is extremely short. On surgery day, we recommend taking it easy, and will provide drops to address any weird sensations or dryness. For the next week, your vision should already be good – however, we still recommend avoiding any activities that might introduce dust or particles to your eye to avoid potential infections. Furthermore, you should wait up to a month to go swimming without goggles. We will see you one day postoperatively and proceed from there. We see that, for most of our patients, surgery day is a little stressful. A week out from surgery, we often hear, “I wish I’d done this sooner!”

LASIK Candidacy

Not everyone is a candidate for LASIK. It is estimated that 15-20% of patients are deemed ineligible by their refractive surgeons. This can be for many reasons, but two of the most common reasons for LASIK non-candidacy are that the cornea is too steep or too thin. The easiest way to know if you’re a candidate for LASIK is to come see us for a free LASIK consultation. LASIK non-candidates may be eligible for other procedures like PRK or ICL.

What is LASIK?

LASIK is a procedure that uses lasers to gently reshape the front section of one’s eyes, improving vision and often times eliminating the need for glasses and contact lenses. LASIK stands for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis. The procedure itself takes only a few minutes to perform, and the recovery time is extremely fast. In fact, many patients see clearly immediately following their procedure, and the vast majority of patients ultimately see 20/20 or better after LASIK.

How LASIK Works

LASIK does not “burn” cells away. The laser used in LASIK is called an excimer laser, and it is a “cold laser” that ablates cells away rather than burning tissue. This type of laser is ideal for reshaping the cornea, which is the clear tissue at the front of the eye. When LASIK was approved in 1996, refractive surgeons (doctors who perform LASIK and other vision improving procedures) did not have many of the advances that we have in modern LASIK.

Wavefront-guided LASIK allows us to use light to generate a unique map (and laser treatment) of your eyes. Your treatment is every bit as unique as your fingerprint. When we create your laser treatment, we are reshaping your cornea such that it refracts light ideally into your eye. However, in order to minimize the recovery time, we also create a corneal flap. This involves using either a microkeratome or another laser to make a thin layer of tissue that is actually folded over and away from the treatment area. Once the treatment is complete, the corneal flap is replaced, and surgery is over.

Recovery Time

Recovery from LASIK is extremely short. On surgery day, we recommend taking it easy, and will provide drops to address any weird sensations or dryness. For the next week, your vision should already be good – however, we still recommend avoiding any activities that might introduce dust or particles to your eye to avoid potential infections. Furthermore, you should wait up to a month to go swimming without goggles. We will see you one day postoperatively and proceed from there. We see that, for most of our patients, surgery day is a little stressful. A week out from surgery, we often hear, “I wish I’d done this sooner!”

LASIK Candidacy

Not everyone is a candidate for LASIK. It is estimated that 15-20% of patients are deemed ineligible by their refractive surgeons. This can be for many reasons, but two of the most common reasons for LASIK non-candidacy are that the cornea is too steep or too thin. The easiest way to know if you’re a candidate for LASIK is to come see us for a LASIK consultation. LASIK non-candidates may be eligible for other procedures like PRK or ICL.